Sitting Meditation

Why We Sit

Traditionally, in China and Korea, only monastics engaged in Zen meditation, usually spending at least six months each year in retreat. But in the West, nearly all Zen practitioners are ordinary men and women, with jobs, families, and community obligations. Because few lay practitioners can dedicate themselves to full-time Zen meditation, modern Zen teaches the importance of “mind-sitting.”

Mind-sitting means keeping a not-moving mind in every life situation. How do you keep not-moving mind? In each moment, just don’t cling to your opinion, condition and situation. When you are doing something, just do it. This is everyday Zen.

In the Kwan Um School of Zen, we emphasize great love, great compassion and the Great Bodhisattva Way. To help people cultivate love, compassion and vow, we teach meditation practice.

For lay people, the teaching of great love, great compassion and the Great Bodhisattva Way is very important. To attain that, it is necessary to keep a not-moving mind, then correct situation, correct function, and correct relationship appear by themselves in everyday life.

How to Sit (Sitting Forms)